Continuing Education

Community Learning Center Urban Achievement Project (CLCUA). M.H.M. Associates, the grant-writer consultants for pursing grant funds, in contractual commmitment with VVCDC submitted a 21st century community learning centers (21st CCLC) Program-cohort 5 2008-09 application to the after school programs office of California department of education on February 15, 2008. The comprehensive concept that was used for this particular grant by M.H.M. was entitled: Community Learning Center Urban Achievement Project (CLCUA).

THe program will provide a school-based VVCDC/CLCUA Project to 1,280 targeted academically underachieving students ages 11 to 13 (grades 6, 7, and 8) with the goal of:

  1. Academic Assistance: Improving academic performance through the integration of one-on-one mentoring into the comprehensive provision of academic assistance
  2. Enrichment: improving behavior and social interaction and expand the perspective of students through the provision of character-building and personal development activities and incorporating enrichment activities and mentor services
  3. Family Literacy Services: Facilitating members of students’ families in need of improving their English literacy skills or in learning English as a Second Language.

Grantees awarded a 21st CCLC program grant will receive five (5) one year grants. Health Awareness-Annual grant amount requested: $2,030,921. Date of announcement is scheduled for late may 2008.

Capacity of funding allows for increase in contract workers, staff, tutors, computer purchases, and site coordinator along with evaluation personnel to accomplish the task. Option also calls for service on-site, if can be arranged.

Family Preservation

Vermont Corridor Community Advisory Council (VCCAC)

VVCDC in collaboration with the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) Vermont Corridor Community Advisory Council (VCCAC) (formerly Century Office and Hawthorne Office Advisory Council) participates on the Advisory Council. VCCAC is established to aid DCFS in providing the best services possible for children and families by promoting: prevention, protection/safety/well being/mental health, education, permanency and emancipation. They are also committed to working together in a collaborative manner to prevent child abuse and the separation of families, if at all possible. VCCAC’s goal is to ensure that families in our community receive culturally, competent and supportive services by identifying strengths that promote family unity and re-unification.

Additionally, VCCAC will identify services needed in the community and support and/or promote programs that educate families to services that are varied, integrated, empowering, culturally and linguistically appropriate and easily accessible. It will be necessary to develop training that would blend caregivers and providers that address the following areas:

  1. Education
  2. Health/Mental Health Services
  3. Drug/Alcohol Abuse Preventative Services
  4. Juvenile Court/Legal Services

Mentoring: Youth & Young Adults

Continuing Education

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Community Learning Center Urban Achievement Project (CLCUA). M.H.M. Associates, the grant-writer consultants for pursing grant funds, in contractual commmitment with VVCDC submitted a 21st century community learning centers (21st CCLC) Program-cohort 5 2008-09 application to the after school programs office of California department of education on February 15, 2008. The comprehensive concept that was used for this particular grant by M.H.M. was entitled: Community Learning Center Urban Achievement Project (CLCUA).

THe program will provide a school-based VVCDC/CLCUA Project to 1,280 targeted academically underachieving students ages 11 to 13 (grades 6, 7, and 8) with the goal of:

  1. Academic Assistance: Improving academic performance through the integration of one-on-one mentoring into the comprehensive provision of academic assistance
  2. Enrichment: improving behavior and social interaction and expand the perspective of students through the provision of character-building and personal development activities and incorporating enrichment activities and mentor services
  3. Family Literacy Services: Facilitating members of students’ families in need of improving their English literacy skills or in learning English as a Second Language.

Grantees awarded a 21st CCLC program grant will receive five (5) one year grants. Health Awareness-Annual grant amount requested: $2,030,921. Date of announcement is scheduled for late may 2008.

Capacity of funding allows for increase in contract workers, staff, tutors, computer purchases, and site coordinator along with evaluation personnel to accomplish the task. Option also calls for service on-site, if can be arranged.

Family Preservation

Vermont Corridor Community Advisory Council (VCCAC)

VVCDC in collaboration with the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) Vermont Corridor Community Advisory Council (VCCAC) (formerly Century Office and Hawthorne Office Advisory Council) participates on the Advisory Council. VCCAC is established to aid DCFS in providing the best services possible for children and families by promoting: prevention, protection/safety/well being/mental health, education, permanency and emancipation. They are also committed to working together in a collaborative manner to prevent child abuse and the separation of families, if at all possible. VCCAC’s goal is to ensure that families in our community receive culturally, competent and supportive services by identifying strengths that promote family unity and re-unification.

Additionally, VCCAC will identify services needed in the community and support and/or promote programs that educate families to services that are varied, integrated, empowering, culturally and linguistically appropriate and easily accessible. It will be necessary to develop training that would blend caregivers and providers that address the following areas:

  1. Education
  2. Health/Mental Health Services
  3. Drug/Alcohol Abuse Preventative Services
  4. Juvenile Court/Legal Services

Mentoring: Youth & Young Adults

Partnerships with established mentoring programs.

VVCDC is developing collaborative partnerships with organzations that provide established mentoring programs in the following areas:

Children Uniting Nations (CUN) is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing quality mentoring relationships for children at-risk and foster care youth. CUN strives to recruit and train community volunteers to help build self-esteem, life skills and improve educational outcomes. CUN offers (4) types of of mentoring programs: a) Relationship-Based Mentoring. mPLAY (Mentoring Partnership for Los Angeles Youth); b) Academic Mentor Centers that provides the proper ongoing academic support in grades 6-11 at one of CUN/mPlay designated Academic Mentor Centers; c) Single Day Events. Mentor just spends one day with a mentee at a CUN outreach event or Dodge Day; and d) Be a Friend. Simply stay in touch by sending appropriate cards, letters and gifts like a pen pal.

Sons of Abraham (S.O.A.) Mentoring Program is a 26-week, Faith-based program established to meet the need for a positive male role model in the lives of young men in the Greater Los Angeles area with the goal of creating responsible male adults through meeting in group settings, providing positive, male role models that teach important character development lessons such as building good character, having a positive attitudes, being creative, making good choices, showing patience, dealing with problems, and taking positive action.

Sarah’s Daughters (S.D.) is a faith-based, social, mentoring program that assists youth girls and women in transforming their lives by guiding them toward improved problem-solving skills, as well as teaching them to be their own advocates to the fullest extent possible so that they may more positively influence family, church, and community. There are 2 divisions, Youth and Women and 4 programs: a) Mentees Program for ages 12-19; b) Mentors-In Training (MIT) a 9-mo covering a core curriculum relevant to roles as mentors; c) Sarah’s Circle for MIT’s and women about women in their various roles in life; and d) The Ladies Court (T.L.C.) Alumni 4-Youth, the next level for ages 12-19 who have successfully completed the Mentee Program.

Financial Literacy

Financial education to make wiser choices in financial management.

As a part of VVCDC’s commitment to help improve the quality of life for the residents of the community. One component is to ensure that community residents have access to financial education programs that help them obtain practical knowledge and skills to make informed financial choices throughout their lives.

With access to financial education, individuals can learn to make wiser choices in all areas of personal financial management, with a special emphasis on budgeting, basic savings, credit management, consumer protection, home ownership and retirement planning.

VVCDC envisions that this will be carried out in the following ways:

  • Perform public outreach to increase awareness
  • Furnish technical assistance to financial education providers
  • Broker partnerships and coordinate with those who provide and need financial education
  • Provide information for the “unbanked” or “underbanked”, those off the financial grid, to develop trust in financial institutions and understand that opening bank accounts and establishing credit are prerequisites to success in the 21st century
  • Hosts and/or present financial seminars and workshops

VVCDC’s efforts will include encouraging government, private and public sector agencies to promote financial literacy; coordinate access to financial education, and establish and/or serve as a clearinghouse to provide information about financial education and empowerment. People of the community face specific challenges and hurdles with regard to accessing needed financial services. Despite these challenges, steps will be taken to improve understanding and utilization of financial services.

CCC Spiritual Counseling

Counseling can include marriage, parentage, domestic violence, and other intervention and prevention issues.

When clients ask about certain matters pertaining to spiritual matters, referrals are made to clergy personnel. A strong referral list is preferred on this matter of spiritual counseling to help someone with complex issues. Fundamentally the precepts of the church support that dependent spouses and children need to be supported.

VVCDC recognizes the right of children to be raised in an environment that is free from violence. Clergy can be recommended to help provide insight and wisdom to these and many other family matters. With social counseling, provided that the personnel is trained and certified. If not, referrals for resolution on these matters are readily available to those who ask. Support groups, and other types of peer groups can help to prevent some conflict.

Under the state policy, children are protected to allow exposure to the religious tradition of both parents. Although faith conducts that marrige is for better or worse, domestic violence or abuse is against the law. There can be severe types of physical and emotional abuse in families that disrupts marriages. It affects not only the victim, but the witnesses of the abuse; rather its the spouse or child. Resource guides to help identify shelters for battered women or men to seek counseling is highly recommended.

Again, protection for victims is paramount in either case. Victims are encountered to seek possible remedies to protect life and property or report directly to the proper authority. In these cases, clients will be encouraged to get Temporary Restraining Orders (EPO). Other options to consider are allowing selective non-profits or professional agency to offer anger management and substance counseling on site.
Types of Resources and Referrals
Family Court Services
Other Family Members
Special Service Clinics
Legal Aide Clinics
Educators
Clergy
Health Care
Therapists
Police

VVCDC Social Counseling

Supporting Existing and Expanding Outreach Programs.

Selective Family Law issues can not be avoided, when you have matters that arise from within a community. With CCC spiritual programs of the church, a social service program could exist on the grounds that would help to make people more self-sufficient. Being all things to all people, puts the church “with the city” in a position to not just give away free goods, but rather extending-a-handout to help people out of situations and not just helping them out.

With Alcohol, Drug Abuse, Program (ADAP), Community Outreach Program (COP), and new Project Accountability (PA), W-CDC has postured itself on effective means and ways to help the increasing number of families in need. Understanding the distinct correlations, between the services being provided by churches, opposed to those of other non-profit service providers keep the separation of church and state aligned.

However, the outcomes are on the same pathway to success for better results that lead to wealth, health, and guidance. Matters that involve social services for the community and or a membership stems to work on issues that could include:

  • Marriage (Dissolution, Legal Separation, Nullity)
  • Property Division (Real Estate, Personal Property, Business Interest, Others)
  • Spousal Support (Mandatory Child Support, Child Custody)
  • Civil Matters (Paternity, Harassment, Domestic Violence, Juveniles)
  • Adult Criminal & Juvenile Delinquency
  • Ex-Offenders & Re-entry
  • Gang & Youth Services
  • Immigration
  • Landlord & Tenant
  • Child Abuse Reporting

In conclusion to the matter, community based matters are broden by the social-economic levels of a community. These social ills are not just related to members of churches, but rather that of a community. The needs many people may encounter during the course of a life time are many. All of these services listed are complex circumstances facing society, linking people with services is what it takes to heal a community.

Health Awareness

VVCDC’s commitment to help improve the quality of Health for the residents of the community.

As a part of VVCDC’s commmitment to help improve the quality of life for the residents of the community, another, yet so often forgotten, component involves health.

VVCDC will collaborate with leading experts in medicine, nutrition, and fitness practitioners. Starting with prenatal care thru seniors’ citizen; enabling community residents to make informed health care choices and have equal access to health information. This in return will provide life-changing skills for residents on having a healthier life span. Health is Wealth!

VVCDC will serve as a clearinghouse between health professionals and the community to provide direct access to sources on quality consumer health information, and help provide an integrated approach to health and fitness including but not limited to the following:

  • Healthy Start; Health related fairs, mini wellness fairs, medical malls, workshops and seminars
  • General wellness: nutrition tips, herbs and health, exercise and fitness basics
  • Disordered Eating Awareness, obesity
  • Healthy eating, dietary habits, weight loss and control. Researchers have found that healthy diets may help children pass tests and do better in school
  • Nutrition (diet), “we are what we eat”
  • Money saving tips in grocery shopping and nutritious food preparation
  • Stress reduction awareness, exercise, relaxation and time management techniques
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Financial Literacy

Financial education to make wiser choices in financial management.

As a part of VVCDC’s commitment to help improve the quality of life for the residents of the community. One component is to ensure that community residents have access to financial education programs that help them obtain practical knowledge and skills to make informed financial choices throughout their lives.

With access to financial education, individuals can learn to make wiser choices in all areas of personal financial management, with a special emphasis on budgeting, basic savings, credit management, consumer protection, home ownership and retirement planning.

VVCDC envisions that this will be carried out in the following ways:

  • Perform public outreach to increase awareness
  • Furnish technical assistance to financial education providers
  • Broker partnerships and coordinate with those who provide and need financial education
  • Provide information for the “unbanked” or “underbanked”, those off the financial grid, to develop trust in financial institutions and understand that opening bank accounts and establishing credit are prerequisites to success in the 21st century
  • Hosts and/or present financial seminars and workshops

VVCDC’s efforts will include encouraging government, private and public sector agencies to promote financial literacy; coordinate access to financial education, and establish and/or serve as a clearinghouse to provide information about financial education and empowerment. People of the community face specific challenges and hurdles with regard to accessing needed financial services. Despite these challenges, steps will be taken to improve understanding and utilization of financial services.

CCC Spiritual Counseling

Counseling can include marriage, parentage, domestic violence, and other intervention and prevention issues.

When clients ask about certain matters pertaining to spiritual matters, referrals are made to clergy personnel. A strong referral list is preferred on this matter of spiritual counseling to help someone with complex issues. Fundamentally the precepts of the church support that dependent spouses and children need to be supported.

VVCDC recognizes the right of children to be raised in an environment that is free from violence. Clergy can be recommended to help provide insight and wisdom to these and many other family matters. With social counseling, provided that the personnel is trained and certified. If not, referrals for resolution on these matters are readily available to those who ask. Support groups, and other types of peer groups can help to prevent some conflict.

Under the state policy, children are protected to allow exposure to the religious tradition of both parents. Although faith conducts that marrige is for better or worse, domestic violence or abuse is against the law. There can be severe types of physical and emotional abuse in families that disrupts marriages. It affects not only the victim, but the witnesses of the abuse; rather its the spouse or child. Resource guides to help identify shelters for battered women or men to seek counseling is highly recommended.

Again, protection for victims is paramount in either case. Victims are encountered to seek possible remedies to protect life and property or report directly to the proper authority. In these cases, clients will be encouraged to get Temporary Restraining Orders (EPO). Other options to consider are allowing selective non-profits or professional agency to offer anger management and substance counseling on site.
Types of Resources and Referrals
Family Court Services
Other Family Members
Special Service Clinics
Legal Aide Clinics
Educators
Clergy
Health Care
Therapists
Police

VVCDC Social Counseling

Supporting Existing and Expanding Outreach Programs.

Selective Family Law issues can not be avoided, when you have matters that arise from within a community. With CCC spiritual programs of the church, a social service program could exist on the grounds that would help to make people more self-sufficient. Being all things to all people, puts the church “with the city” in a position to not just give away free goods, but rather extending-a-handout to help people out of situations and not just helping them out.

With Alcohol, Drug Abuse, Program (ADAP), Community Outreach Program (COP), and new Project Accountability (PA), W-CDC has postured itself on effective means and ways to help the increasing number of families in need. Understanding the distinct correlations, between the services being provided by churches, opposed to those of other non-profit service providers keep the separation of church and state aligned.

However, the outcomes are on the same pathway to success for better results that lead to wealth, health, and guidance. Matters that involve social services for the community and or a membership stems to work on issues that could include:

  • Marriage (Dissolution, Legal Separation, Nullity)
  • Property Division (Real Estate, Personal Property, Business Interest, Others)
  • Spousal Support (Mandatory Child Support, Child Custody)
  • Civil Matters (Paternity, Harassment, Domestic Violence, Juveniles)
  • Adult Criminal & Juvenile Delinquency
  • Ex-Offenders & Re-entry
  • Gang & Youth Services
  • Immigration
  • Landlord & Tenant
  • Child Abuse Reporting

In conclusion to the matter, community based matters are broden by the social-economic levels of a community. These social ills are not just related to members of churches, but rather that of a community. The needs many people may encounter during the course of a life time are many. All of these services listed are complex circumstances facing society, linking people with services is what it takes to heal a community.

Health Awareness

VVCDC’s commitment to help improve the quality of Health for the residents of the community.

As a part of VVCDC’s commmitment to help improve the quality of life for the residents of the community, another, yet so often forgotten, component involves health.

VVCDC will collaborate with leading experts in medicine, nutrition, and fitness practitioners. Starting with prenatal care thru seniors’ citizen; enabling community residents to make informed health care choices and have equal access to health information. This in return will provide life-changing skills for residents on having a healthier life span. Health is Wealth!

VVCDC will serve as a clearinghouse between health professionals and the community to provide direct access to sources on quality consumer health information, and help provide an integrated approach to health and fitness including but not limited to the following:

  • Healthy Start; Health related fairs, mini wellness fairs, medical malls, workshops and seminars
  • General wellness: nutrition tips, herbs and health, exercise and fitness basics
  • Disordered Eating Awareness, obesity
  • Healthy eating, dietary habits, weight loss and control. Researchers have found that healthy diets may help children pass tests and do better in school
  • Nutrition (diet), “we are what we eat”
  • Money saving tips in grocery shopping and nutritious food preparation
  • Stress reduction awareness, exercise, relaxation and time management techniques
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